Moleskine’s new range digitally saves handwriting


Moleskine LivescribeNotebook manufacturer Moleskine has revealed its latest range, which can ‘back up’ handwritten notes as digital text.

Moleskine worked with Livescribe to create the new notebooks, which incorporate a smartpen and use Livescribe paper.

The special paper is covered in dots, which allow the smartpen’s camera to track your writing, sending the information on to be converted through the Livescribe app.

This technology complements Moleskine’s traditional style in the new range, which still uses the ribbon, elastic closure, and luxury cover associated with the brand.

Find out more about the new product here and tell us what you think of it.

Yerka Project: the ‘unstealable’ bike


Project YerkaThree engineering students from Chile have created an ‘unstealable’ bike.

The students, who have named their idea ‘Yerka Project’, use a surprisingly simple way of securing the bike: by using its own frame.

Yerka Project’s middle pipe divides and attaches to the removable seat, forming a lock – all that it then needs is to be fastened to a post .

The prototype locks with a key, though the team are working on variations of the bike that can lock with combinations.

The team came up with their idea after one of them was targeted twice by bike thieves.

Find out more about the unstealable bike here or watch the video below – do you think it’s a good idea?

‘Matter’ app gives photos a futuristic feel


Matter appA new app lets users alter their photographs by giving them an otherworldly feel.

‘Matter’ offers four model packs, containing 3D objects and structures, which can be edited into pictures.

The embedded elements can be manipulated with shadows, masks, and can even be made translucent or opaque.

Users can also create looping videos of the structures in motion.

Watch ‘Matter’ in action below or find out more about it here – would you use this innovative new app?

Energy Duck


Energy DuckA team of designers has devised a renewable energy generator in the shape of a duck.

The Energy Duck has been submitted to the Land Art Generator Initiative competition in Copenhagen and is intended to be an interactive, educational installation as well as a fun public artwork.

The generator is based on the common eider duck, which is native to Copehagen and is under the threat of climate change.

The 12-storey-high duck, which would float in Copenhagen harbour, would have a steel frame covered in a skin of photovoltaic panels for energy generation, which would contribute to the city power grid.

Find out more about this innovative idea here.

An organic phone charger made of fruit and veg


Organic chargerThe new Nokia Lumia 930 has been showcased with a charger made of fruit and vegetables.

Microsoft and Carphone Warehouse teamed up on the outdoor ‘Back to Light’ campaign, which has demonstrated the phone being charged by over 800 apples and potatoes.

The public demonstration took place at Westfield in Shepherd’s Bush and was designed by artist Caleb Charland, who took inspiration from the classic classroom project of making batteries out of fruit.

Charland said: “By creating this large organic charger to power a Lumia 930 device, this work speaks to a common curiosity we all have for how the world works, as well as a global concern for the future of Earth’s energy sources.”

Find out more about the demonstration here and let us know what you think.

A window emulating sunlight from around the world


CoeLux windowA smart window can recreate different types of sunlight through ingenious technology.

CoeLux uses a full-spectrum LED lighting system, with a special pane that reproduces the Rayleigh scattering effect of sunlight travelling through the atmosphere.

The window is available in three options, mimicking the sunlight of the tropics, the Mediterranean, or Scandinavia.

Find out more about CoeLux here and tell us what you think of the idea.

Dove brings ‘100 colours’ to shopping centres


Dove 100 colours screensDove installed colour-detecting digital screens in shopping centres across the country, as part of its ‘100 colours’ campaign.

The screens recognised the dominant colour of a person’s clothing and then showed them a demonstration of Dove’s deodorant being sprayed on fabric of a similar colour – proving that the deodorant doesn’t stain clothes.

The screens finished the demonstration by telling users where to buy Dove within the shopping centre.

The campaign, put together by Kinetic, was carried out in shopping centres including Bluewater and Lakeside.

Find out more about the campaign here and tell us what you think.

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