The Kodatrope


The KodatropeAn interactive sculpture lets users view hundreds of photographs as it spins around them.

The Kodatrope, by Lee Pivnik, is made from over five hundred photographic slides and is large enough to be placed over a viewer’s head and shoulders.

The photographs, which were mainly taken in the 1960s and 1970s, have been collected from a variety of families for the project.

As the light passes through the rotating Kodatrope, different photos catch the viewer’s eye, focusing them on complete strangers and their unknown stories.

Find out more about the Kodatrope here and let us know what you think of it.

Lifelike paper bird models


Paper bird modelA Colombian artist creates stunning, lifelike paper figurines of colourful birds.

Diana Beltran Herrera uses nature photographs as inspiration for her amazing three-dimensional renderings, which are made of hundreds of pieces of coloured paper.

Her sculptures include a kingfisher in flight, a proud cockerel, and a striking greater bird of paradise.

Herrera, who is currently studying for a Fine Arts Master’s in Bristol, also works on display windows for fashion brands and a number of commissioned projects.

See more of her work on Flickr here.

Mercedes-Benz sculpture at Goodwood


Mercedes-Benz sculptureAn artist celebrates Mercedes-Benz’s long motor racing history with a new sculpture at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

Gerry Judah has created an 85-foot-high steel installation arching over Goodwood House, featuring two iconic Formula 1 cars: the 1934 Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrow and Lewis Hamilton’s 2013 Mercedes.

The racing cars seem to defy gravity as they hang suspended, as if they had just passed each other in the air.

Judah designs an eye-catching artwork for Goodwood every year and his past installations include an infinite loop with four Lotus racing cars.

Find out more about the sculpture here and let us know what you think of it.

‘Dead parrot’ installed in London


Dead parrotA giant dead parrot was installed in London last week to celebrate the last Monty Python show.

The 50 foot fibreglass sculpture was a tribute to Monty Python’s famous ‘dead parrot’ sketch and was placed near Tower Bridge in the run-up to the last show.

The sculpture took more than two months to complete; lead sculptor Iain Prendergast said: “The key challenge for us was capturing the comedy value of the dead parrot, keeping the realism of the bird whilst also adding touches like the bloodshot, stunned eyes.”

The parrot was delivered to the O2 Arena for the final performance of Monty Python’s ‘Live (mostly)’ farewell show on Sunday.

Find out more about the dead parrot here and tell us what you think of the stunt.

123: an innovative sculpture


123A unique sculpture called ‘123’ looks like different numbers, depending on the angle at which it is viewed.

The black stainless steel installation, by James Hopkins, is carefully arranged to ‘create slippages in perception’.

Therefore, as the viewer moves around the sculpture, it seems to morph into different shapes.

Watch the video below to see the sculpture transform and tell us what you think of the playful project.

Landed: an installation with a difference


A house seems to have mysteriously appeared, half-buried outside an Australian art gallery.

The totally black house is actually an installation called ‘Landed’ by artist Ian Strange, who has recreated his childhood home for the project.

‘Landed’, which contrasts 20th Century Australian suburbia with the Victorian Art Gallery of South Australia, alludes to the ‘sudden appearance of western culture’ on the continent.

Commissioned for the 2014 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, ‘Landed’ is on show outside the gallery until May 11th.

Take a closer look at the installation here and tell us what you think of it.

Brainwaves as a sculpture


Our brainwaves can now be mapped as three-dimensional models, thanks to an innovative art project.

Ion Popian uses electroencephalogram (EEG) sensors to measure brain activity, which is fed into a 3D modelling programme.

Changes in the fluid model are produced by different intensities of brain activity, but specific emotions, such as happiness, can’t be mapped on the model.

After editing the model, Popian creates a 3D-printed sculpture of the brainwaves; he now hopes to use his concept for architecture.

Find out more about the project, called ‘Mental Fabrications’, here and tell us what you think of the idea – would you map your brainwaves?

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