A DNA-inspired art trail


Cancer Research UK has launched an innovative art trail, based on the DNA double helix.

The organisation has teamed up with SomeOne to install twenty one DNA-inspired sculptures around London, in order to raise awareness for the Francis Crick Institute.

The double helix sculptures has been customised by top artists, including Ai Weiwei and Orla Kiely.

The pieces range from the sleek and futuristic to the colourful and avant-garde, celebrating the complexity of DNA.

Along with Rosalind Franklin, Maurice Wilkins, and James Watson, Francis Crick discovered the structure of DNA in the 1950s.

These amazing installations will be placed around London for ten weeks; discover them here and tell us if you’ll be looking out for them.

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Madison Square Park’s striking mirage


A stunning mirrored structure has been installed above Madison Square Park in New York.

Teresita Fernández’s 500ft sculpture is made of uniquely shaped mirror-polished discs, creating a kaleidoscopic illusion known as a ‘Fata Morgana’. 

‘Fata Morgana’ creates an ethereal experience for Park visitors, becoming ‘a ghost-like, sculptural, luminous mirage that both distorts the landscape and radiates golden light’, as the artist explained.

The installation will remain in Madison Square Park until Winter 2016.

Take a closer look at this impressive structure here and tell us if you’ll be visiting the Park.

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Glasscapes


Two artists have completed a unique sculptural project made from several layers of coloured glass.

Lucie Boucher and Bernie Huebne created Glasscapes, a collection of three stunning sculptures with hand-cut painted glass layers that can be rearranged.

For instance, the seascape Ocean Laughter II can either look like a tumultuous ocean or a harmonious work of geometric art.

Explore Glasscapes here and let us know what you think.

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Italian city filled with Gormley statues


Florence is now filled with more than a hundred pieces of art by Antony Gormley, known for the Angel of the North, throughout his career.

The innovative ‘Human’ exhibition, which runs until the 27th September 2015, displays Gormley’s stunning work exploring the human body through ‘blockworks’ and more organic pieces like Critical Mass.

The 16th Century Forte di Belvedere is hosting most of the collection, with the rest, including ‘Critical Mass’, scattered around the historic fortress for a striking effect.

Have a closer look at ‘Human’ here and tell us if you’ll be visiting.

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Paperholm: a city of moving paper miniatures


PaperholmDesigner Charles Young has been painstakingly crafting a whole ‘city’ of paper miniatures that move.

His city, called ‘Paperholm’, gains a new addition every day and models include a carousel and a windmill.

Each miniature is made from standard watercolour paper and depending on the intricacy of the piece, Young can spend up to three hours making just one model.

The designer has a Masters in Architecture and began model-making as a way of exploring his concepts.

Find out more about Paperholm here and tell us what you think.

Steel installation pays tribute to the Kelpies


The KelpiesAn artist in Scotland has crafted two giant horse head sculptures which rise out of the water in tribute to the legendary Kelpies.

Andy Scott’s ‘The Kelpies’ is assembled from sheets of steel, which are illuminated purple from their interior.

Rising out of the Forth & Clyde canal, The Kelpies are inspired by the famous Scottish myth of water spirits that take the form of a horse.

Take a closer look at The Kelpies here and let us know what other myths and legends should get the installation treatment.

A three-dimensional ‘pixellated’ installation


Many Small CubesAn architect has created a carefully balanced installation made of aluminium cubes.

Sou Fujimoto’s ‘Many Small Cubes’ has a three-dimensional pixellated effect, with the different sized cubes stacked, suspended, and balanced into a towering form.

The centre of the installation is hollow, encouraging the public to explore ‘Many Small Cubes’ from its interior.

The installation has been created for the FIAC art fair in Paris.

Take a closer look at the installation here and let us know what you think.

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