The best storytelling brands


Best Storytelling BrandsNew research has revealed which brands are best at storytelling, which helps consumers invest in their product.

The study, by Aesop and OnePoll, asked consumers to rate brands for personality, memorability, and credibility, among other factors.

Charities and technology brands are overtaking established stalwarts for storytelling; with Apple remaining at the top of the ranks, supermarkets are being superseded by the likes of YouTube, Virgin Media and Macmillan Cancer Support.

Cadbury is also highlighted as a strong storytelling brand, thanks to its innovative marketing strategy, which has included high-profile experiential stunts.

Find out more about the research here and tell us which brands you think are good storytellers.

How is social media affecting television habits?


Social media television habitsNew research from YouView reveals how social media usage is affecting the way UK viewers are watching television.

The study discovered that one in seven viewers search through social networks to find television recommendations, while over a quarter stay off social media when they need to avoid spoilers.

YouView surveyed two thousand viewers and also asked them about their ‘second screening’ habits (nearly one in six are on Twitter while watching a programme).

Find out more about the research here and tell us if social media influences your television habits.

What makes a brand popular?


Brand popularityNew research suggests that not only is brand popularity more complex than just sales figures, it can also be recovered if a brand’s reputation slips.

The study by Leo Burnett divides brands into categories: ‘superstars’, ‘rising stars’, ‘settled greats’ and ‘former glories’.

A brand’s popularity and momentum determine in which category it ends up, along with other brand attributes, including affinity and longevity.

Leo Burnett analysed 5,000 responses to fifty brands, including Innocent and Heinz, and revealed the results to Marketing Week.

Find out more about the research here and tell us which brand attributes are important to you.

What types of video engage viewers?


Coull video studyA new study has revealed the kinds of video content that keeps viewers watching for longer, with some interesting findings.

The research, by Coull, took into account 12 million video plays during May in the UK.

Videos featuring cars engaged 61% of their audience throughout the play time, while people, travel and animals held onto around half of their viewers until the end.

However, with only 43% of sports video viewers watching whole videos, Coull’s CEO suggests that sports publishers and brands could innovate more online, especially in a World Cup year.

Find out more about Coull’s findings here, and tell us about your favourite kinds of video content.

Brand fatigue and brand affection across the globe


New research has revealed which countries and age groups have a close relationship with brands.

Momentum Worldwide’s global study discovered that the Philippines, Mexico and Brazil rated highly for brand affection, with around 60–70% of consumers regarding their relationship with brands as being ‘friendships or stronger’.

However, the research also found that countries with a long sustained exposure to advertising, such as the USA and the UK, experience ‘brand fatigue’ and show a far greater emotional distance to brands.

The study, which had 6,504 respondents, was carried out in twelve countries. Chris Weil, Momentum Worldwide’s CEO, said that the study’s results are “a wake-up call to marketers across the world that brands must evolve with their audiences”.

Find out more about the study here or take a look at MarketingWeek’s infographic.

Study sheds light on retail environments


The relationship between lighting and customer experience has been explored in a new study, which reveals some interesting findings about customer perception.

The experiment, which was conducted by Zumtobel and Gruppe Nymphenburg, presented forty eight participants – who were put into groups based on their personality types – with a computer simulation of a retail display.

The picture underwent twenty changes in lighting while the participants were monitored for any unconscious physical reactions they might have, such as cardiac or neurological activity.

The study found that the ‘stimulance’ group (made of ‘hedonists’ and ‘adventurers’) had a positive reaction to strong lighting contrasts, such as bold spotlights, while the ‘balance’ group (‘bon vivants’, ‘harmonisers’ and ‘traditionalists’) and the ‘dominance’ group (‘performers’ and ‘disciplinarians’) preferred softer, more subtle lighting effects.

It has been suggested that these results could be used to modify retail environments’ lighting to suit their target audience. Read more about the study here.

What makes brands attractive to young people?


The most recent Youth 100 report reveals young people’s favourite brands and companies, and what makes them attractive.

The research discovered that there are three key attributes that young people (classed as aged 18 – 24) rate: convenience, fun and moneysaving.

Brands that are ‘good’ at or combine any of these factors tended to score highly – having a strong social media presence also helped.

Google and Skype were rated highly as brands that made life easier, while fashion brand H&M did well thanks to its perceived value for money. Several ‘fun’ brands appear at the top of the 100, including YouTube and Ben & Jerry’s, but website BuzzFeed (known for its fun factor and social media) was a surprise omission.

The research, which was conducted by Voxburner in collaboration with Thinkhouse and The Student Room, polled more than 2500 young people on 250 brands.

Take a look at Marketing Week’s infographic and summary of the report here and tell us what you think of the results.

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