Sony World Photography Awards 2015 shortlist revealed


The world’s biggest photography competition has unveiled its shortlist. Sony World Photography Awards 2015

Amazing entries from all over the world have been received for this year’s Sony World Photography Awards – the highest amount since its creation. 

Astrid Merget Motsenigos, Creative Director of the World Photography Organisation and organizer of the awards, says “the sole purpose of the Sony World Photography Awards is to celebrate and appreciate the talented artists working in the photographic industry.”

You will be able to have a proper look at the shortlisted images at Somerset House in London from April 24 to May 10.

Discover some of the photographs here and tell us what you think.

White ‘bubbles’ bursting out of ordinary landscapes


A French photographer unveiled a series of photographs that feature white balloons bursting out of empty spaces. Bubbles

Charles Pétillon created ‘Invasion’, in which each photo represents a metaphor, aiming to change our perception of the supposedly ordinary scenes we encounter.

This series will be exhibited at Maison Européene de la Photographie in Paris until March 22, 2015.

Watch Petillon’s stunning work below and let us know what you think.

//player.vimeo.com/video/117929734

‘Book for Architects’ installation


Book for ArchitectsAn installation showcasing incredible architecture has opened at the Metropolitan Museum in New York.

Wolfgang Tillmans’ ‘Book for Architects’ has been ten years in the making, and includes photographs of buildings from thirty seven countries.

The installation consists of 450 photographs, which were captured using standard lenses to approximate the perspective of the naked eye.

The images are projected as a two-channel video installation onto perpendicular walls, which the Museum describes as a ‘personal portrait of contemporary architecture that will be familiar to everyone’.

Find out more about ‘Book for Architects’ here.

Creative Trends Report


Creative Trends ReportShutterstock has released its 2015 Creative Trends Report, revealing the latest global design developments.

The report is based on search insights from Shutterstock’s own library of images, music, and videos, revealing interesting statistics around current trends.

It covers visual preferences around the world, highlighting themes such as ‘geometric’ for France, ‘vintage’ for Brazil, and ‘clean eating’ for Australia.

It also looks at design trends, social trends, and top music moods.

Take a look at the whole report here and tell us which trends are influencing your design choices.

Surreal images created with an iPhone


Surreal Images created with an iPhoneA photographer has created surreal photographs using his iPhone.

German-based art director Robert Jahns, who goes by the Instagram handle nois7, has created amazing images using editing apps including VSCOcam, ArtStudio and Snapseed.

Most of the photographs were taking during his travels, shot with his iPhone or DSLR.

Others are composites of stock images or collaborations with other photographers. Jahns’ editing process varies from 2 hours to several days.

Creating surreal and intricate manipulations with an iPhone, he fundamentally explores subversion of reality and medium.

Take a look at more spectacular images here.

Photographer documents world’s oldest trees


Photographer documents world's oldest trees

Beth Moon, a San Francisco based photographer, has documented some of the oldest, rarest and largest trees in the world.

Using the rare practice of plantium and palladium printing in order to make the photos themselves look old, Moon’s choice of medium underscores the age of her subject matter.

Moon writes: “Standing as the Earth’s oldest and living monuments, I believe these symbolic trees will take on greater significance, especially at a time when our focus is directed at finding better ways to live with the environment.”

Take a look at more spectacular images here.

An adaptable pop-up habitat


Pop-up habitatPeople’s Architecture Office has created a pop-up habitat that can be adapted to its environment.

The system consists of units made from gold photographer’s reflective panels, which can stand alone or become part of a larger geometric ‘mega-structure’.

The lightweight habitat, which has been used at exhibitions, can act as tunnels, canopies, exhibition spaces and auditoriums – as well as intriguing pieces of art scattered around a landscape.

Find out more about the habitat here and let us know what you think.

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