‘Dancing House’ light installation


Dancing housesAn artist is presenting an interesting project for the Light Festival in Ghent, Belgium. 

Klaus Obermaier’s ‘Dancing House’ interactive installation allows you to distort a house while you move.

Visitors can stand in front of the display, where they are invited to move their arms and bodies to change the building’s shape and hear the sound of the wind as they do so. 

As this festival becomes increasingly popular (over half a million visitors in the previous years), it has been named one of Europe’s top 10 light art festivals.

Watch the video below and tell us what you think about it.

A shimmering landscape made from thousands of CDs


CD landscapeAn artist has created a piece of art made of 60,000 old CDs.

French artist Elise Morin introduced the Waste Landscape installation last year at Kunsthalle in Košice, Slovakia during White Night 2014.

The vast mass of the hand-sewn CDs on inflatable mounds looks different to everyone in the audience due to the various lighting schemes.

The artist explains that the choice of a CD is a symbolic one when responding to the growing waste produced by modern society – for her, it represents the vision of the economy of western societies in the second part of the 20th century.

Take a look at the video of the installation below and tell us what you think.

//player.vimeo.com/video/111012341

Colourful flowers frozen in ice


Ice FlowersA botanical artist in Tokyo has encased colourful flowers in blocks of ice, exploring how this changes the plants’ life cycles.

Makoto Azuma’s ‘Ice Flowers’ enhances the vibrancy and size of the bouquets, which have been arranged in a derelict warehouse outside of the city.

However, as the ice melts, the flowers will wither, until they are left in puddles of water.

Azuma says: ‘please enjoy how flowers and ice change themselves over time in the ruins far from human existence – it is an inorganic space that makes a vivid contrast with flowers’.

Take a closer look at the installation here and tell us what you think of it.

‘Book for Architects’ installation


Book for ArchitectsAn installation showcasing incredible architecture has opened at the Metropolitan Museum in New York.

Wolfgang Tillmans’ ‘Book for Architects’ has been ten years in the making, and includes photographs of buildings from thirty seven countries.

The installation consists of 450 photographs, which were captured using standard lenses to approximate the perspective of the naked eye.

The images are projected as a two-channel video installation onto perpendicular walls, which the Museum describes as a ‘personal portrait of contemporary architecture that will be familiar to everyone’.

Find out more about ‘Book for Architects’ here.

Gigantic white rabbits on Southbank


IntrudeAustralian artist Amanda Parer has created ‘Intrude’, an edgy installation which was on display at the Southbank until Sunday 11th January.

‘Intrude’ sees striking rabbits enlarged and frozen within the Royal Festival Hall’s foyer spaces.

These sculptures “explore the natural world, its fragility and our role within in” and were also on display at the 2014 Vivid Festival in Sydney.

Find out more about Intrude here.

Steel installation pays tribute to the Kelpies


The KelpiesAn artist in Scotland has crafted two giant horse head sculptures which rise out of the water in tribute to the legendary Kelpies.

Andy Scott’s ‘The Kelpies’ is assembled from sheets of steel, which are illuminated purple from their interior.

Rising out of the Forth & Clyde canal, The Kelpies are inspired by the famous Scottish myth of water spirits that take the form of a horse.

Take a closer look at The Kelpies here and let us know what other myths and legends should get the installation treatment.

A three-dimensional ‘pixellated’ installation


Many Small CubesAn architect has created a carefully balanced installation made of aluminium cubes.

Sou Fujimoto’s ‘Many Small Cubes’ has a three-dimensional pixellated effect, with the different sized cubes stacked, suspended, and balanced into a towering form.

The centre of the installation is hollow, encouraging the public to explore ‘Many Small Cubes’ from its interior.

The installation has been created for the FIAC art fair in Paris.

Take a closer look at the installation here and let us know what you think.

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