Spectra lights up the night sky


SpectraA pillar of light in London has commemorated the beginning of World War I.

Spectra, by Ryoji Ikeda, shot up through the night on 4th August to mark the centenary of the War, just as landmarks were dimmed and the final candle in Westminster Abbey was snuffed out.

The installation, located in Victoria Tower Gardens, was part of the Royal British Legion’s ‘Lights Out’ campaign and lit up the night sky for a week.

Take a look at more pictures of Spectra here and let us know what you think.

‘Mind-bending’ geometric art


Geometric artA French artist creates art that only ‘makes sense’ at one point of view.

Georges Rousse creates three-dimensional geometric artworks, which consist of several separate components arranged around a space.

From most perspectives, the art looks like a collection of parts – but at just the right angle, it fits together like a seamless painting.

Rousse takes a single photograph of the art at this perfect perspective, challenging audiences to work out how it really comes together.

Take a closer look at the art here and tell us what you think of it.

Mercedes-Benz sculpture at Goodwood


Mercedes-Benz sculptureAn artist celebrates Mercedes-Benz’s long motor racing history with a new sculpture at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

Gerry Judah has created an 85-foot-high steel installation arching over Goodwood House, featuring two iconic Formula 1 cars: the 1934 Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrow and Lewis Hamilton’s 2013 Mercedes.

The racing cars seem to defy gravity as they hang suspended, as if they had just passed each other in the air.

Judah designs an eye-catching artwork for Goodwood every year and his past installations include an infinite loop with four Lotus racing cars.

Find out more about the sculpture here and let us know what you think of it.

‘Dead parrot’ installed in London


Dead parrotA giant dead parrot was installed in London last week to celebrate the last Monty Python show.

The 50 foot fibreglass sculpture was a tribute to Monty Python’s famous ‘dead parrot’ sketch and was placed near Tower Bridge in the run-up to the last show.

The sculpture took more than two months to complete; lead sculptor Iain Prendergast said: “The key challenge for us was capturing the comedy value of the dead parrot, keeping the realism of the bird whilst also adding touches like the bloodshot, stunned eyes.”

The parrot was delivered to the O2 Arena for the final performance of Monty Python’s ‘Live (mostly)’ farewell show on Sunday.

Find out more about the dead parrot here and tell us what you think of the stunt.

We Are Flowers installation


We are flowersSOFTlab has transformed a New York shoe gallery with a colourful ceiling installation.

The designers took inspiration from Galeria Melissa’s ‘We Are Flowers’ shoe collection by creating a three-dimensional lattice suspended from the ceiling.

This was covered by over 20,000 translucent ‘flowers’ of different colours, and funnelled towards the ground at selected points in the gallery.

Take a closer look at the striking installation here or watch the video below, and let us know your thoughts.

The ‘biggest design poster ever made’


Malmo Festival posterAn enormous poster which took 900 hours to complete is publicising the Malmö Festival in Sweden.

Described as the ‘biggest design poster ever made’, the poster by SNASK is a physical, interactive installation made of massive shapes which visitors can climb.

The colourful project, which is eight metres wide and and thirteen metres long, used 175 litres of paint, 280 plywood boards and 10,000 nails in its construction.

It celebrates the 30th Malmö Festival, which is taking place in August.

Take a closer look at the innovative poster here and tell us what you think.

LEGO bus stop on Regent Street


LEGO bus stopTransport for London (TfL) is celebrating the Year of the Bus by installing a bus stop made entirely from LEGO bricks.

The stop, which is on Regent Street, has been created in conjunction with the nearby Hamleys toy stop and is made from 100,000 pieces of LEGO.

It took two weeks to put together, but TfL hopes the bus shelter with a difference ‘will bring a smile to the face of even a hardened commuter’.

Even the windows of the bus stop have been replaced with clear LEGO bricks, although the more complex transport maps were printed as usual and then pasted onto the LEGO wall.

The Year of the Bus celebrates several bus-related anniversaries, including the 60th anniversary of the iconic Routemaster bus.

Take a closer look at the LEGO bus stop here and let us know what you think of it.

Palette


PaletteAn installation at the GREAT Festival of Creativity celebrates Britain and Turkey’s relationship through clever use of colour.

‘Palette’, by Paul Cocksedge, consists of translucent acrylic circles in red, white and blue, representing the colours of the British and Turkish flags.

When the circles overlap, different tones are produced, such as purple or pink, an effect that the artist says ‘celebrates that collaboration’ between the two countries.

The GREAT Festival of Creativity highlights the best in British and Turkish design and took place in Istanbul in May.

Find out more about ‘Palette’ here – do you think the installation celebrates Britain and Turkey’s history?

123: an innovative sculpture


123A unique sculpture called ‘123’ looks like different numbers, depending on the angle at which it is viewed.

The black stainless steel installation, by James Hopkins, is carefully arranged to ‘create slippages in perception’.

Therefore, as the viewer moves around the sculpture, it seems to morph into different shapes.

Watch the video below to see the sculpture transform and tell us what you think of the playful project.

Transarquitetônica


TransarquitetônicaA Brazilian museum is hosting an immense installation that resembles a giant network of roots.

Transarquitetônica by Henrique Oliveira is made of tapumes (a wood used for temporary construction), which is used as a skin over a metal framework.

The installation, which is so large that visitors can walk around inside its tunnels, winds around its space in the Museu de Arte Contemporânea and tapers into smaller roots at one end.

Watch the video below or take a closer look at the installation here – would you wander around Transarquitetônica?

Lighting Giants


Lighting GiantsA new tourist attraction in Croatia uses industrial cranes in a nocturnal light show called ‘Lighting Giants’.

Designed by architectural lighting designer Dean Skira, ‘Lighting Giants’ uses RGB LED spotlights to illuminate the cranes at the Uljanik shipyard in Pula.

The project came about when the 158-year-old shipyard was going to be relocated, although Skira first came up with the idea in 2000.

Funded privately and by the Croatian Ministry of Tourism, ‘Lighting Giants’ has to accommodate the working activities of the shipyard.

Find out more about the project here or watch the video below.

Glowing dandelion lights


OLED TampopoA cinematographer has transformed dandelions into a collection of artistic lights.

Takao Inoue used fresh dandelion seed heads (often called ‘dandelion clocks’ due to their fluffy, spherical appearance) for the project, which he named ‘OLED Tampopo’.

Inoue installed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) into the stems of the dandelions, before encasing them in in transparent plastic blocks.

OLED Tampopo was originally created for an exhibition at the Milano Salone del Mobile earlier this year.

Take a closer look at OLED Tampopo here and let us know your thoughts about the artwork.

Primary – a lighting installation


PrimaryAn Australian installation used coloured light to play with visitors’ spatial perception.

Primary, by Flynn Talbot, consisted of a triangular panel with protruding cardboard spikes, which were up to two metres in length.

Talbot then cast red, green and blue spotlights over the geometric panel, creating a mixture of moving and overlapping colours playing off the panel’s angles.

Talbot said: “Colour in light is different to paint, for example. Red and green paint make brown but with light they create yellow. The wall sculpture is designed to break up the light and explore the mixing of colour.”

Primary was exhibited at the PSAS gallery in Perth, Australia.

Watch the video below to experience the light-bending installation and tell us what you think of it.

Primary from flynntalbot on Vimeo.

Landed: an installation with a difference


A house seems to have mysteriously appeared, half-buried outside an Australian art gallery.

The totally black house is actually an installation called ‘Landed’ by artist Ian Strange, who has recreated his childhood home for the project.

‘Landed’, which contrasts 20th Century Australian suburbia with the Victorian Art Gallery of South Australia, alludes to the ‘sudden appearance of western culture’ on the continent.

Commissioned for the 2014 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, ‘Landed’ is on show outside the gallery until May 11th.

Take a closer look at the installation here and tell us what you think of it.

Delta Social Soul


A digital installation has given users the chance to find their ‘social soulmate’ by immersing them in other people’s social media streams.

Delta Social Soul’, which consisted of a room covered in monitors and mirrors, displayed the visitor’s Twitter feed and uses an algorithm to find their ‘social soulmate’ among other attendees of the Vancouver TED conference.

The experience was devised by experiential marketing agency MKG and was inspired by Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Rooms.

Find out more about ‘Delta Social Soul’ here and let us know what you think of the immersive installation.

Colourful Space Invaders land on college campus


A college campus in Switzerland is currently hosting some street art with a difference: a ‘3D’ installation of iconic game Space Invaders.

Leon Keer and Remko van Schaik spent six days transforming a plaza on the EPFL campus in Lausanne into a massive game of Space Invaders, using just paint, perspective and exceptional attention to detail.

Measuring 150 square metres, the bold and colourful ‘Art on Science’ project invites students to interact with it, with many wondering how the anamorphic effect was produced.

Take a closer look at the project here and tell us if you think more legendary games should be turned into street art.

A multipurpose staircase


A house in the Netherlands boasts an unusual staircase – as well as being semi-suspended, it offers a range of storage areas.

Objet Élevé, which has been incorporated into Just Haasnoot’s home, uses open frames to combine shelves, storage space and even a desk into the staircase, which is constructed in two main parts.

The bottom half includes the desk and stands like a conventional staircase; there is then a small gap before the suspended half, which provides shelves and handy storage areas.

Made from oak and black steel, Objet Élevé was handmade by Dutch studio Mieke Meijer.

Take a closer look at the unique construction here and tell us if you would like a multipurpose staircase in your home.

‘Moments of Warmth’


Duracell has launched a new campaign encouraging Canadians to keep warm in the harsh winter – by holding hands in a special interactive bus shelter.

The bus shelter, which loosely resembles a Duracell battery, has heaters that only turn on once its occupants complete a ‘circuit’.

They do this by holding hands and pressing on the positive and negative signs on either end of the shelter.

Duracell filmed the campaign, which it entitled ‘Moments of Warmth’, with the help of creative agency Cossette.

You can watch the advert below, and tell us if you would take part in a ‘Moment of Warmth’.

White Tree: a tower with branches


The design for a 17-storey tower in France has been revealed, named ‘White Tree’, or ‘arbre blanc’.

White Tree, which will be built in Montpellier, has an organic feel with ‘leaves’ branching off the main body of the tower, creating modular spaces and areas of shade.

Inspired by Mediterranean and Japanese influences (the design team includes NLA, OXO and Sou Fujimoto), the tower also incorporates hanging gardens, plants and trees.

White Tree will overlook the historic and modern parts of Montpellier, and is designed to be a mixed-use tower, including an art gallery and a panoramic bar.

Find out more about the unique design here and tell us what you think of it.

The Sustainability Treehouse


Architectural practice Mithun has designed a tree-house with a difference in West Virginia – it educates visiting Scouts about sustainability.

The Sustainability Treehouse, which is 125 feet tall, has been designed to encourage ‘camp adventure, environmental stewardship and innovative building design’.

Using a weathering steel frame to rise through the trees, the tree-house incorporates wind turbines and photovoltaic panels for renewable energy.

With interactive galleries and educational spaces at ground, tree canopy and sky levels, the Sustainability Treehouse is an immersive and entertaining experience for any of its visitors.

Take a closer look at the structure here and tell us if you would like to see more ‘living buildings’.

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