The Kodatrope


The KodatropeAn interactive sculpture lets users view hundreds of photographs as it spins around them.

The Kodatrope, by Lee Pivnik, is made from over five hundred photographic slides and is large enough to be placed over a viewer’s head and shoulders.

The photographs, which were mainly taken in the 1960s and 1970s, have been collected from a variety of families for the project.

As the light passes through the rotating Kodatrope, different photos catch the viewer’s eye, focusing them on complete strangers and their unknown stories.

Find out more about the Kodatrope here and let us know what you think of it.

Spectra lights up the night sky


SpectraA pillar of light in London has commemorated the beginning of World War I.

Spectra, by Ryoji Ikeda, shot up through the night on 4th August to mark the centenary of the War, just as landmarks were dimmed and the final candle in Westminster Abbey was snuffed out.

The installation, located in Victoria Tower Gardens, was part of the Royal British Legion’s ‘Lights Out’ campaign and lit up the night sky for a week.

Take a look at more pictures of Spectra here and let us know what you think.

‘Mind-bending’ geometric art


Geometric artA French artist creates art that only ‘makes sense’ at one point of view.

Georges Rousse creates three-dimensional geometric artworks, which consist of several separate components arranged around a space.

From most perspectives, the art looks like a collection of parts – but at just the right angle, it fits together like a seamless painting.

Rousse takes a single photograph of the art at this perfect perspective, challenging audiences to work out how it really comes together.

Take a closer look at the art here and tell us what you think of it.

Mercedes-Benz sculpture at Goodwood


Mercedes-Benz sculptureAn artist celebrates Mercedes-Benz’s long motor racing history with a new sculpture at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

Gerry Judah has created an 85-foot-high steel installation arching over Goodwood House, featuring two iconic Formula 1 cars: the 1934 Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrow and Lewis Hamilton’s 2013 Mercedes.

The racing cars seem to defy gravity as they hang suspended, as if they had just passed each other in the air.

Judah designs an eye-catching artwork for Goodwood every year and his past installations include an infinite loop with four Lotus racing cars.

Find out more about the sculpture here and let us know what you think of it.

‘Dead parrot’ installed in London


Dead parrotA giant dead parrot was installed in London last week to celebrate the last Monty Python show.

The 50 foot fibreglass sculpture was a tribute to Monty Python’s famous ‘dead parrot’ sketch and was placed near Tower Bridge in the run-up to the last show.

The sculpture took more than two months to complete; lead sculptor Iain Prendergast said: “The key challenge for us was capturing the comedy value of the dead parrot, keeping the realism of the bird whilst also adding touches like the bloodshot, stunned eyes.”

The parrot was delivered to the O2 Arena for the final performance of Monty Python’s ‘Live (mostly)’ farewell show on Sunday.

Find out more about the dead parrot here and tell us what you think of the stunt.

We Are Flowers installation


We are flowersSOFTlab has transformed a New York shoe gallery with a colourful ceiling installation.

The designers took inspiration from Galeria Melissa’s ‘We Are Flowers’ shoe collection by creating a three-dimensional lattice suspended from the ceiling.

This was covered by over 20,000 translucent ‘flowers’ of different colours, and funnelled towards the ground at selected points in the gallery.

Take a closer look at the striking installation here or watch the video below, and let us know your thoughts.

The ‘biggest design poster ever made’


Malmo Festival posterAn enormous poster which took 900 hours to complete is publicising the Malmö Festival in Sweden.

Described as the ‘biggest design poster ever made’, the poster by SNASK is a physical, interactive installation made of massive shapes which visitors can climb.

The colourful project, which is eight metres wide and and thirteen metres long, used 175 litres of paint, 280 plywood boards and 10,000 nails in its construction.

It celebrates the 30th Malmö Festival, which is taking place in August.

Take a closer look at the innovative poster here and tell us what you think.

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