White ‘bubbles’ bursting out of ordinary landscapes


A French photographer unveiled a series of photographs that feature white balloons bursting out of empty spaces. Bubbles

Charles Pétillon created ‘Invasion’, in which each photo represents a metaphor, aiming to change our perception of the supposedly ordinary scenes we encounter.

This series will be exhibited at Maison Européene de la Photographie in Paris until March 22, 2015.

Watch Petillon’s stunning work below and let us know what you think.

//player.vimeo.com/video/117929734

Artist recreates famous pictures with Pantone swatches


An artist uses Pantone Swatches to recreate famous paintings. 

Nick Smith uses hundreds of different Pantone swatches in order to give life to work of arts with a pixelated impression.

He has recreated masterpieces of legendary artists such as Andy Warhol, Vincent van Gogh, and Leonardo da Vinci.

You can discover Smith’s artworks at his art show, ‘Psycolourgy’, held at the Lawrence Alkin Gallery in London until 21 February 2015.

Have a look at some of them here and tell us what you think about it.

Glowing dandelion lights


OLED TampopoA cinematographer has transformed dandelions into a collection of artistic lights.

Takao Inoue used fresh dandelion seed heads (often called ‘dandelion clocks’ due to their fluffy, spherical appearance) for the project, which he named ‘OLED Tampopo’.

Inoue installed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) into the stems of the dandelions, before encasing them in in transparent plastic blocks.

OLED Tampopo was originally created for an exhibition at the Milano Salone del Mobile earlier this year.

Take a closer look at OLED Tampopo here and let us know your thoughts about the artwork.

Primary – a lighting installation


PrimaryAn Australian installation used coloured light to play with visitors’ spatial perception.

Primary, by Flynn Talbot, consisted of a triangular panel with protruding cardboard spikes, which were up to two metres in length.

Talbot then cast red, green and blue spotlights over the geometric panel, creating a mixture of moving and overlapping colours playing off the panel’s angles.

Talbot said: “Colour in light is different to paint, for example. Red and green paint make brown but with light they create yellow. The wall sculpture is designed to break up the light and explore the mixing of colour.”

Primary was exhibited at the PSAS gallery in Perth, Australia.

Watch the video below to experience the light-bending installation and tell us what you think of it.

Primary from flynntalbot on Vimeo.

Landed: an installation with a difference


A house seems to have mysteriously appeared, half-buried outside an Australian art gallery.

The totally black house is actually an installation called ‘Landed’ by artist Ian Strange, who has recreated his childhood home for the project.

‘Landed’, which contrasts 20th Century Australian suburbia with the Victorian Art Gallery of South Australia, alludes to the ‘sudden appearance of western culture’ on the continent.

Commissioned for the 2014 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, ‘Landed’ is on show outside the gallery until May 11th.

Take a closer look at the installation here and tell us what you think of it.

Ecobuild opens its doors for the tenth time!


London’s ExCel arena opened its doors to Ecobuild 2014 this week.

Ecobuild is a yearly exhibition that is a must-see event for architects, contractors and manufacturers in the green building industry.

This edition saw Ecobuild celebrate its ten year anniversary.

There were a few highlights from this year’s show, featuring cinematic tents, wooden pianos and many compelling presentations on the cutting edge topics in the green building industry.

The UKGBC were also in attendance – one of their highlights was to show off their new Pinpoint website which The Think Tank are very pleased to have developed for them.

Take a look at the highlights and find out more here.

Crockery that melts into puddles


A London-based artist has created an art series named ‘Nomad Patterns’, based on porcelain crockery, which appear to be melting.

Livia Marin takes pieces of porcelain, such as mugs and plates, and fragments them, using resin and plaster to create ‘puddles’ which pool around the remnants of crockery.

To complete the effect, Marin paints the puddles with the crockery’s pattern, which is the ‘Willow Pattern’ motif first made famous in the 18th Century and associated with traditional English tea.

Through the series, which uses around thirty pieces, Marin intends to explore the relationship between the treatment given to elite items, such as antique crockery, compared to the ‘use and discard’ culture for mass-produced objects.

Take a closer look at Nomad Patterns here and tell us what you think of this ‘melting’ art.

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