Mall of the World


Mall of the WorldDubai has unveiled plans for the world’s first indoor city, called ‘Mall of the World’.

The giant dome, which will be climate-controlled, recreates iconic parts of cities from across the world, including Oxford Street, Broadway and Las Ramblas.

The 4.5 million sq m city will also boast the world’s biggest indoor theme park and shopping mall, along with 20,000 hotel rooms.

Dubai is already known for several record-breaking constructions, including the world’s tallest building.

Find out more about the Mall of the World here and tell us what you think.

The ‘biggest design poster ever made’


Malmo Festival posterAn enormous poster which took 900 hours to complete is publicising the Malmö Festival in Sweden.

Described as the ‘biggest design poster ever made’, the poster by SNASK is a physical, interactive installation made of massive shapes which visitors can climb.

The colourful project, which is eight metres wide and and thirteen metres long, used 175 litres of paint, 280 plywood boards and 10,000 nails in its construction.

It celebrates the 30th Malmö Festival, which is taking place in August.

Take a closer look at the innovative poster here and tell us what you think.

Photographs of Design Museum revealed


The Design MuseumPhotographs of the new Design Museum in South Kensington have been released.

The museum, which is currently under construction, is due to open in 2016 and will be three times the size of the current building.

The £80 million project will include design workshops and a design library, a free-to-enter permanent collection and a gift shop.

A virtual tour of the site was made available online last year.

Find out more here and let us know what you think about the project.

Landesgartenschau: an exhibition hall built by robots


Landesgartenschau Exhibition HallAn exhibition hall has a structure created entirely from plywood prefabricated by robots.

The Landesgartenschau Exhibition Hall in Germany has been constructed using digital design and robotic fabrication techniques, which also included insulation, waterproofing and cladding.

The hall’s structure consists of 243 hexagonal plywood panels and the double-domed design is inspired by the skeletal structure of a sea urchin, which is described as ‘one of the most efficient modular systems in nature’.

Find out more about the design here and tell us what you think.

Maison des Fondateurs


Maison des FondateursBjarke Ingels Group has unveiled its spiralling design for a Swiss watchmaker’s museum.

The project, entitled ‘Maison des Fondateurs’, is partially sunken into the ground and incorporates spiral geometry, invoking the feel of cogs and other watch pieces.

Based at Audemars Piguet’s headquarters in Vallée de Joux, the building will hold the watchmaker’s workshops and galleries.

Find out more about the design here and tell us what you think of it.

RIBA Awards winners


Tate Britain, Millbank ProjectThe Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the winners of the 2014 RIBA Awards.

The fifty six winners are drawn from regional categories for the National Awards, with a separate category for projects by British architects in the European Union.

High-profile winners include The Shard by Renzo Piano Building Workshop; Tate Britain, Millbank Project by Caruso St John Architects; and Danish Maritime Museum by BIG.

The Stirling Prize shortlist will be drawn from the winners and will be announced in July.

Find out more about the Awards here.

123: an innovative sculpture


123A unique sculpture called ‘123’ looks like different numbers, depending on the angle at which it is viewed.

The black stainless steel installation, by James Hopkins, is carefully arranged to ‘create slippages in perception’.

Therefore, as the viewer moves around the sculpture, it seems to morph into different shapes.

Watch the video below to see the sculpture transform and tell us what you think of the playful project.

Transarquitetônica


TransarquitetônicaA Brazilian museum is hosting an immense installation that resembles a giant network of roots.

Transarquitetônica by Henrique Oliveira is made of tapumes (a wood used for temporary construction), which is used as a skin over a metal framework.

The installation, which is so large that visitors can walk around inside its tunnels, winds around its space in the Museu de Arte Contemporânea and tapers into smaller roots at one end.

Watch the video below or take a closer look at the installation here – would you wander around Transarquitetônica?

Sky Habitat


Sky HabitatArchitect Moshe Safdie has designed an astonishing building with a sky pool 38 storeys high.

‘Sky Habitat’ consists of two white tiered towers connected by garden bridges and the sky pool –although there is also a swimming pool at ground level for less adventurous swimmers.

Located in Singapore, Sky Habitat will include over 500 apartments and is due to be completed next year.

Take a closer look at the design here and let us know if you would brave the sky pool.

Clerkenwell Design Week


Visualisation of Jaguar Foscarini installationThe fifth Clerkenwell Design Week opened on Tuesday 20th May, hosting the most innovative products, designers and brands around. Here are a few of our favourite locations on the showcase trail:

Design Factory – The Farmiloe Building

Jaguar and Italian lighting firm Foscarini have created a dramatic scene in the Design Factory’s atrium, pairing a bespoke Jaguar with a supersized light installation by Ferruccio Laviani.

Jaguar invited designers to submit concept wraps for its new Jaguar F-TYPE Coupé, using the #FearlessDesign hashtag on Twitter and Instagram.

The winning design, ‘Untamed Creativity’ by Justin Silke, resembles a dynamic scrawl, which Jaguar described as embodying their ‘design ethos of visual drama and individualism’.

Laviani’s Tuareg consists of orange and black tubular elements arranged into a three-dimensional structure and suspended from the ceiling. There are other Tuareg installations on display in the Foscarini stage, alongside other work, including Big Bang by Vicente Garcia Jimenez, Lightwing by Jean Marie Massaud and Rituals by Ludovica and Roberto Palomba.

Detail – St. John’s Square

Another exhibition worth visiting is Detail at St. John’s Square, which hosts luxury interior brands. One must-see is the edra showcase in the medieval crypt of the Order of St. John; featuring work from designers such as the Campana brothers, the pieces combine eclectic influences and reimagine them in classic furniture styles. The lowlights and tranquillity of the crypt somehow enhance the ‘otherness’ of the collection, ensuring a memorable experience.


Tile Mile – St. John’s Gate

Tile Mile - DezeenTile Mile invites visitors to revel in the kaleidoscopic effect of the transformed St. John’s Gate, which is described in The Icon Guide to CDW as being ‘reminiscent of the famous Basilica Cistern in Istanbul’.

Using mirrors in the inner arches and a complex, colourful floor tile design, Tile Mile also reflects the archway’s stunning vaulted ceiling. The temporary installation was created by architects russ + henshaw and sponsored by Turkishceramics.

Find out more about Clerkenwell Design Week (which runs until the 22nd May) here.

A billboard that absorbs pollution


Air Purifying BillboardA university in Peru has unveiled a pollution-busting billboard designed to tackle the effects of the country’s industrial growth.

Universidad de Ingeniería y Tecnología (UTEC) teamed up with ad agency FCB Mayo to create the billboard, which can purify 100,000 cubic metres of polluted air in a day.

The billboard uses a water filtration system to absorb the polluted air, which contains metal and stone particles as well as dust and germs, and discharges fresh, clean air back into the atmosphere.

UTEC has previously created a water-producing billboard, which won five Cannes Lions awards.

Watch the video below to find out more about this clever billboard, and tell us if you think more should be built.

How to build ten houses in a day


How to build ten houses in a dayA company in China can construct up to ten buildings a day, thanks to its innovative use of 3D printing and waste material.

Yingchuang New Materials uses its own technology to print walls and other structures (the roof is the only part that can’t yet be printed) made out of cement and construction waste.

The company demonstrated their method by building ten houses in 24 hours at a Shanghai industrial park; apparently the printing process itself took twelve years to perfect.

Watch a news report of the construction below, find out more about the process here and tell us what you think of this unique take on prefabrication.

Viewpoint St Jansklooster


Viewpoint St JanskloosterAn old water tower in the Netherlands has been transformed into an observation point.

Zecc Architecten has overhauled St Jansklooster (St John’s Convent) Tower by installing three different staircases leading visitors to a stunning view of the surrounding wetlands, 45 metres high.

The most extraordinary staircase is the second, made of oriented strand board, which zigzags around the existing steel staircase, which the design team describe as creating ‘spatial interaction’ and reinforcing ‘spatial perception’.

As well as the staircases, four larger windows have been added to the viewing platform to give a 360 degree vista.

The St Jansklooster Tower was built in 1932 and now also incorporates a visitor’s centre.

Find out more about Viewpoint St Jansklooster here.

The Hive-Inn – a ‘Jenga-like’ hotel


An architecture firm has developed the Hive-Inn hotel, which uses the principle of Jenga.

The design, which is by OVA Studio, uses recycled shipping containers stacked in a metal frame.

The containers can be shifted according to the hotel’s requirements, which is made easy by the grid-like structure, and could even be sponsored by brands.

The design was entered for the Radical Innovation Award, which has been searching for creative hospitality solutions since 2007.

Find out more about the Hive-Inn here.

Groundbreaking landmark on New Jersey site


This landmark project called ‘Journal Squared’ is set to become the tallest building in New Jersey, USA.

Journal Squared, which is an urban renewal project, will include three unique towers with a strong white and blue cuboid design, dominating but not overwhelming the surrounding area.

The design, which was created by Hollwich Kushner and Handel Architects, has been described as ‘touch[ing] the ground lightly as its mass morphs into smaller units’.

The lower levels of the mixed-use towers will become retail and leisure areas with ‘tree-filled plazas’, while the upper stories of the towers will be residential.

Take a closer look at Journal Squared here and let us know what you think of the design.

A multipurpose staircase


A house in the Netherlands boasts an unusual staircase – as well as being semi-suspended, it offers a range of storage areas.

Objet Élevé, which has been incorporated into Just Haasnoot’s home, uses open frames to combine shelves, storage space and even a desk into the staircase, which is constructed in two main parts.

The bottom half includes the desk and stands like a conventional staircase; there is then a small gap before the suspended half, which provides shelves and handy storage areas.

Made from oak and black steel, Objet Élevé was handmade by Dutch studio Mieke Meijer.

Take a closer look at the unique construction here and tell us if you would like a multipurpose staircase in your home.

End of the World Cinema


An Estonian photographer has rediscovered a long-lost cinema – in the middle of the desert.

Kaupo Kikkas took pictures of his visit to the makeshift cinema, which lies abandoned on the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt.

On his blog, Kikkas claims that the venue was actually only built around fifteen years ago, by a Frenchman who wondered why there were no cinemas in the middle of the desert.

However, the local authorities apparently sabotaged the cinema before it could screen a single film, yet it remains intact surrounded by sand and mountains.

Find out more about the intriguing venue here and tell us what you think of it.

‘Cardboard Cities’


A photographer has completed ‘Cardboard Cities’, a project described as a ‘personal view’ of cities such as London, Paris and Tokyo.

Andy Rudak collaborated with model maker and set builder Luke Aan de Wiel to create cardboard dioramas of areas in the cities, such as part of a tenement building or slums nestled by a river.

The photographs have a ‘dream-like’ feel, as they appear to be set at night and contain just one wild animal each, with no humans in any of the scenes.

Rudak has studios in New York and London, and has worked on many high-profile campaigns for clients such as British Airways, Coca Cola and HSBC, while Aan de Wiel has experience in advertising and exhibitions.

Take a closer look at ‘Cardboard Cities’ here and tell us what you think of the sets.

Designer transforms waste into unique furniture


Designer Piet Hein Eek, famous for making furniture from waste material, has taken his vision one step further by creating his ‘Waste Waste’ range.

‘Waste Waste’ uses the wood offcuts that are too small to be used in the original ‘Waste’ collection, in which he takes scrap material and constructs items from scratch. For the new range, Eek cuts the awkwardly-shaped remnants into 40mm by 40mm cubes and uses them as a skin on a design rather than the whole construction, cutting down on labour and time.

This method creates simple, strong pieces, such as round ‘pixellated’ tables, and each piece is unique due to the cubes’ original varnish or paint.

Take a look at the collection here and tell us if you would have one of these pieces in your living room.

Black or white? Chameleon cabin changes colour when seen from different angles


An architect has designed a cabin that seemingly changes colour, thanks to the angle at which it is observed.

Mattias Lind used durable MiniWell corrugated paper for the cabin and each alternate ridge was painted black or white, which creates the interesting effect. Depending on the angle, the cabin looks striped, completely black or completely white. The inside of the cabin is painted bright yellow as a vibrant warm contrast.

The cabin is constructed from 92 separate modules that fit together with tabs and slots, so it can be extended. For this project, the cabin is short and compact (7sq m), resembling a Swedish ‘friggebod’ shed.

Lind, who works at White Arkitekter, created the cabin in conjunction with Happy F&B for local company Göteborgstryckeriet.

Take a look at the quirky cabin here and tell us if you would like one of these fun sheds in your garden.

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