We Are Flowers installation


We are flowersSOFTlab has transformed a New York shoe gallery with a colourful ceiling installation.

The designers took inspiration from Galeria Melissa’s ‘We Are Flowers’ shoe collection by creating a three-dimensional lattice suspended from the ceiling.

This was covered by over 20,000 translucent ‘flowers’ of different colours, and funnelled towards the ground at selected points in the gallery.

Take a closer look at the striking installation here or watch the video below, and let us know your thoughts.

The ‘biggest design poster ever made’


Malmo Festival posterAn enormous poster which took 900 hours to complete is publicising the Malmö Festival in Sweden.

Described as the ‘biggest design poster ever made’, the poster by SNASK is a physical, interactive installation made of massive shapes which visitors can climb.

The colourful project, which is eight metres wide and and thirteen metres long, used 175 litres of paint, 280 plywood boards and 10,000 nails in its construction.

It celebrates the 30th Malmö Festival, which is taking place in August.

Take a closer look at the innovative poster here and tell us what you think.

Pantone posters with character


Pantone 7686 CPantone’s new ad campaign shows how crucial colour is for iconic pop culture characters.

‘There can only be one’, devised by Y & R Shanghai, uses the features of famous cartoon and puppet figures against a background square of their dominant colour.

Completed by their Pantone numbers, the posters demonstrate that a strong colour is key to making characters instantly recognisable.

The posters include ‘Pantone 7686 C’, a deep blue, which uses googly eyes to represent Sesame Street’s Cookie Monster.

Take a look at all three posters here and tell us what you think of the fun concept.

Palette


PaletteAn installation at the GREAT Festival of Creativity celebrates Britain and Turkey’s relationship through clever use of colour.

‘Palette’, by Paul Cocksedge, consists of translucent acrylic circles in red, white and blue, representing the colours of the British and Turkish flags.

When the circles overlap, different tones are produced, such as purple or pink, an effect that the artist says ‘celebrates that collaboration’ between the two countries.

The GREAT Festival of Creativity highlights the best in British and Turkish design and took place in Istanbul in May.

Find out more about ‘Palette’ here – do you think the installation celebrates Britain and Turkey’s history?

The 10 Commandments of Colour Theory


The 10 Commandments of TypographyDesignMantic’s latest infographic reveals some handy colour theory guidelines, suggesting ways to combine and contrast colours.

The infographic, which is a sequel to DesignMantic’s ‘The 10 Commandments of Typography’, looks at the significance of certain colours, the colour wheel and different colour models, such as Pantone and RGB.

It also explores how to use contrasting and complementary colours, including ‘hues, tints, shades and tones’.

Take a look at the whole infographic here and tell us what you think of the rules.

Monochrome photos given a new life in colour


Colourised photosIt’s easy to view history in shades of grey when so many historic photographs and films are in monochrome or sepia, but the trend for digitally colourising old pictures is catching on.

Professional and amateur artists painstakingly research the context of black and white photos to ensure that the colours and textures they restore are as historically accurate as possible. If they can’t know for sure, the colouriser uses their judgement and sense of colour to fill in the gaps.

Famous photographs that have been colourised include ones of Marilyn Monroe, Albert Einstein, and a newspaper boy selling news of the Titanic.

Take a look at twenty colourised photos here and tell us what you think of them.

A ‘Pantone’ book – from 1692


Pantone bookThe Pantone Colour Guide revolutionised the design industry in the 1960s, but a historian has recently discovered its antique equivalent, predating the Guide by 271 years.

Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau’, found by Erik Kwakkel, consists of almost eight hundred pages detailing how to mix watercolours.

Painstakingly completed by hand by an artist known only as A. Boogert, the book bears an incredible resemblance to the layout of Pantone colours, with carefully painted squares of colour demonstrating the mix of water and paint.

Take a look at the whole book here and let us know what you think of the extraordinary discovery.

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