A self-driving car for goldfish


Fish on WheelsA Dutch design studio has given goldfish some freedom by unveiling its fish tank on wheels.

Studio Diip’s ‘Fish on Wheels’ is a robotic four-wheeled car, attached to a bespoke tank that includes a webcam that tracks the goldfish’s movements.

The tracking data is relayed to an Arduino microchip, which then drives the vehicle in whichever direction the fish is moving.

The studio said: “Our pet fish have always been limited to their water holding area known as ‘the fish tank’. In an attempt to liberate fish all over the world, the first self-driving car for fish has been developed. Hopefully this invention will encourage more development in enhanced pet mobility, so pet animals can travel the world more freely.”

Watch Fish on Wheels in action below and tell us if you’d buy this for your goldfish.

Hemingway novels as Instagram films


Hemingway in 15 secondsAn organisation is hoping to overhaul Ernest Hemingway’s image by producing 15-second Instagram films of some of his books.

The Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park has teamed up with Ogilvy & Mather Chicago for the short videos, which offer animated interpretations of famous works, including A Farewell to Arms and For Whom the Bell Tolls.

Hemingway’s writing is often perceived as simple and lean, but the films aim to challenge viewers by exploring the deeper meanings behind it.

Watch some of the videos here and let us know which other famous novels you would like to see immortalised on Instagram.

Night at…a KLM plane


Night at...Airbnb is offering some lucky users the chance to experience a unique stay inside a KLM plane.

The company, which enables people to advertise their extra living space for travellers and tourists, will be posting the ‘night at…a KLM plane’ opportunity on its site – all entrants need to do is state why they should be the winner.

Three individual nights are up for grabs on the MD-11 airbus, which has stylish refurbished interiors by TANK.

‘Night at…a KLM plane’ follows Airbnb’s previous giveaway, which was a stay at the Château de Chenonceau in the Loire valley.

Find out more about the competition here and tell us if you’ll be entering.

A three-dimensional ‘pixellated’ installation


Many Small CubesAn architect has created a carefully balanced installation made of aluminium cubes.

Sou Fujimoto’s ‘Many Small Cubes’ has a three-dimensional pixellated effect, with the different sized cubes stacked, suspended, and balanced into a towering form.

The centre of the installation is hollow, encouraging the public to explore ‘Many Small Cubes’ from its interior.

The installation has been created for the FIAC art fair in Paris.

Take a closer look at the installation here and let us know what you think.

Kit Kat unveils world’s first ‘splactor’ in fun new advert


SplactorKit Kat’s new advert offers an interesting explanation for its new product by introducing the world’s first ‘splactor’, or ‘split actor’.

The spot follows ‘Martin Mahogany’ on a film set as he plays two characters at the same time, with each half of his body in different costume and makeup.

To achieve his ambitious performances, he physically turns around to switch character, delivering his lines with utmost seriousness.

As the world’s first ‘splactor’, Martin is happy to take the credit for Kit Kat’s new Chunky Double Caramel bar, which takes a similar approach with two contrasting fillings.

Watch the ad below and tell us what you think of it.

How our brains ‘see’ logos


How Your Brain 'Sees' a LogoAn infographic reveals why we subconsciously make associations between logos and the brands they represent.

The chart, by Logo Maker, shows how our brains perceive a logo and how this impacts our decision-making.

It uncovers the parts of our brains that reacts to logos, such as the ventral medial frontal pole (which activates for brands we like), and how certain logos can change our behaviour.

See the whole infographic here.

Eerie dioramas produced by 3D printing glitches


DioramaAn artist produces eerie dioramas by deliberately glitching the 3D printing process.

Mathieu Schmitt creates dark, snowy scenes with objects, such as benches, lampposts, and cars, which are intentionally imperfect.

The objects are the result of corrupted 3D model data, giving them misshapen or distorted features.

Schmitt then places the objects into black cubes, which block nearly all natural light, and then illuminates the odd features for a beautiful, yet unsettling, effect.

See more of his work here and tells us what you think of it.

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