Art of Building Photographer of the Year shortlist


Art of BuildingThe shortlist for the Art of Building Photographer of the Year competition has been revealed.

The fifteen shortlisted pictures include stunning interpretations of constructions such as One London Bridge, an Amsterdam metro line, and the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi.

The competition, which has been running for five years, is organised by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and is overseen by a panel of judges of photography experts.

The winner of the competition will be announced on 5th February and will win £3,000.

Take a look at the shortlist here and tell us which is your favourite.

Mountain lodge designed as a silver cube


Kežmarské HutArchitects have devised a futuristic lodge in the shape of a cube balancing in the mountains.

Atelier 8000 has entered its design, which would be built in the High Tatra Mountains in Slovakia, to an international competition.

The silver cube would be almost camouflaged in the winter months, thanks to its reflective tiles (which are made of aluminium, glass, and photovoltaics).

The design, called the ‘Kežmarské Hut’, would be completely off the grid and could be occupied throughout the year.

Find out more about the lodge here and tell us if you would like to stay in the ethereal cube.

Stirling Prize winner revealed


Everyman TheatreThe new Everyman Theatre in Liverpool has won the RIBA Stirling Prize 2014.

Haworth Tompkins’ winning project replaces the original Everyman Theatre, which was in a state of disrepair, with a new and sustainable building that recognises its heritage.

Stephen Hodder, RIBA President, said: “Complementing beautifully with the surrounding listed buildings, it is a ground-breaking example of how to build a daring, bold and highly sustainable large public building in a historic city centre.”

The award, which is given to the best building of the year, is now in its nineteenth year.

Find out more about the winner here.

London footbridge opens like a fan


Merchant Square footbridgeA footbridge that opens and closes like a hand-held fan has been completed in London.

The Merchant Square footbridge in Paddington was completed by Knight Architects and AKT II, after winning a competition in 2012.

Their design for a ‘kinetic sculpture’ consists of five steel beams that can be raised with hydraulic jacks to allow canal traffic to pass through.

When the bridge is down, pedestrians can use the three metre wide crossing, which has an LED-lit handrail at night, over the Grand Union Canal.

Take a look at the bridge here and tell us if you’ll be taking a stroll over it.

Stirling Prize shortlist revealed


The ShardRIBA has released the shortlist for its prestigious Stirling Prize.

Six new buildings have been shortlisted for the Prize, which is awarded to the project that has made the most significant contribution to architecture in the United Kingdom.

The nominations, which include Renzo Piano’s The Shard, are drawn from the public, commercial, and educational spheres.

Zaha Hadid, a previous recipient of the Stirling Prize, has also been nominated for the London Aquatics Centre.

The winner will be announced by RIBA on the 16th October.

Find out which buildings have been nominated here.

Photographs of Design Museum revealed


The Design MuseumPhotographs of the new Design Museum in South Kensington have been released.

The museum, which is currently under construction, is due to open in 2016 and will be three times the size of the current building.

The £80 million project will include design workshops and a design library, a free-to-enter permanent collection and a gift shop.

A virtual tour of the site was made available online last year.

Find out more here and let us know what you think about the project.

How to build ten houses in a day


How to build ten houses in a dayA company in China can construct up to ten buildings a day, thanks to its innovative use of 3D printing and waste material.

Yingchuang New Materials uses its own technology to print walls and other structures (the roof is the only part that can’t yet be printed) made out of cement and construction waste.

The company demonstrated their method by building ten houses in 24 hours at a Shanghai industrial park; apparently the printing process itself took twelve years to perfect.

Watch a news report of the construction below, find out more about the process here and tell us what you think of this unique take on prefabrication.

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