Photographer captures stunning light patterns in water


Stephen Orlando, an Ontario-based photographer has transformed the repetitive motions of canoers, kayakers and swimmers into gorgeous light paintings. Light Paintings Patterns in Water Photographer Stephen Orlando

Attaching customisable LED lights to his subjects, Orlando used long exposure times in order to capture the movements across the water.
The strands represent individual strokes across time and space.

Stephen said “Using LED lights with custom colour patterns and long exposure photography, I’m able to tell the story of movement. This technique reveals beautiful light trails created by paths of familiar objects.”

Let us know what you think about these stunning images and click here to view more.

An artist walks miles to create beautiful snow drawings


Snow landscapesArtist Sonja Hinrichsen has created these beautiful snow drawings by walking over the frozen Catamount Lake in Colorado. 

Sonja and over 60 volunteers wore snowshoes to tread these beautiful and highly decorative patterns into several miles of snow.

This piece of land art is part of Sonja’s Snow Drawings series, an on-going project that provides the community with an opportunity to experience their familiar surroundings as art.

The creative process and the relationship with the outdoors is a central element in Sonja’s work; as art and the landscape fuse together, the project unlocks a sense of modern society’s re-engagement with the natural world.

The aerial photographs help demonstrate to a wider audience how systems of designs can transform the landscape into art.

Let us know what you think of this gorgeous swirling land art and click here to find out more.

Paperholm: a city of moving paper miniatures


PaperholmDesigner Charles Young has been painstakingly crafting a whole ‘city’ of paper miniatures that move.

His city, called ‘Paperholm’, gains a new addition every day and models include a carousel and a windmill.

Each miniature is made from standard watercolour paper and depending on the intricacy of the piece, Young can spend up to three hours making just one model.

The designer has a Masters in Architecture and began model-making as a way of exploring his concepts.

Find out more about Paperholm here and tell us what you think.

Steel installation pays tribute to the Kelpies


The KelpiesAn artist in Scotland has crafted two giant horse head sculptures which rise out of the water in tribute to the legendary Kelpies.

Andy Scott’s ‘The Kelpies’ is assembled from sheets of steel, which are illuminated purple from their interior.

Rising out of the Forth & Clyde canal, The Kelpies are inspired by the famous Scottish myth of water spirits that take the form of a horse.

Take a closer look at The Kelpies here and let us know what other myths and legends should get the installation treatment.

Eurostar’s #bettercloser campaign


#bettercloserTo celebrate its 20th anniversary, Eurostar is highlighting the cultural benefits the service has brought to Europe with a new campaign.

Eurostar’s #bettercloser campaign uses customers’ real responses to show the greater cultural understanding between London, Paris, and Brussels since the train service began in 1994.

Artists, including Jean Jullien and Adrian Johnson, brought these responses to life in the form of creative marketing material, including posters and an exclusive Metro newspaper wrap.

Read more about the campaign here.

A three-dimensional ‘pixellated’ installation


Many Small CubesAn architect has created a carefully balanced installation made of aluminium cubes.

Sou Fujimoto’s ‘Many Small Cubes’ has a three-dimensional pixellated effect, with the different sized cubes stacked, suspended, and balanced into a towering form.

The centre of the installation is hollow, encouraging the public to explore ‘Many Small Cubes’ from its interior.

The installation has been created for the FIAC art fair in Paris.

Take a closer look at the installation here and let us know what you think.

Digital flowers that bloom when approached


Digital flower installationA former factory has been transformed into a reactive digital installation of flowers that bloom when a viewer walks up to them.

The installation, by teamLab, covers four inner walls of the factory in Japan.

The digitally rendered flora blooms and explodes into petals when a visitor approaches the walls, filling the dark room with colour.

The flowers are rendered in real time and refreshed every hour.

Take a closer look at the installation here and tell us what you think.

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