The Sky Pool


If you’re enjoying London’s hot weather this week, why not imagine doing so while swimming in mid-air?

Arup Associates has designed an innovative ‘sky pool’, a 25-metre-long swimming pool which will bridge two blocks of apartments in Nine Elms, south London.

The pool, inspired by aquariums, will be completely transparent, affording swimmers with striking views of the city as they paddle and tread water.

Apartment developer Ballymore Group’s CEO, Sean Mulryan, said: “The Sky Pool’s transparent structure is the result of significant advancements in technologies over the last decade. The experience of the pool will be truly unique, it will feel like floating through the air in central London.”

Find out more about the Sky Pool here and tell us if you would have a swim in it.

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Britain’s tallest sculpture gains a slide


London architecture firm Bblur has designed an epic slide, which will wrap around the tallest sculpture in the UK.

The ArcelorMittal Orbit, an observation tower in London’s Olympic Park, will be home to a slide that allows visitors to exit the tower in a more stylish way than usual – at 15mph.

The slide itself, which will be around 180m long, will get riders to the bottom in approximately 40 seconds, giving them a unique view of the city skyline along the way.

Opening in spring 2016, the slide may become a new hit tourist attraction – read more about this fun idea here.

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The world’s most controversial buildings


Did you know that some of the world’s most beloved buildings were once hated by thousands?

Iconic designs such as The Eiffel Tower, Tower Bridge, and Empire State Building all gained bad reputations when first built, but now are seen as innovative and symbolic of their home cities.

For example, the famous writer Guy de Maupassant described the Eiffel Tower as a “tall skinny pyramid of iron ladders, this giant and disgraceful skeleton”. Some people even looked forward to the Tower being taken down as scheduled (a day which never passed).

Read more about the world’s most controversial buildings here and tell us what you think. 

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A Gensler-designed pet pampering centre


New York’s JFK Airport is planning to open a new animal spa centre.  

International architecture firm Gensler has designed The ARK, which allows pets to have their own luxury experiences while travelling.  

Treatments include a veterinary hospital, a care centre with a spa and grooming services, and even a diagnostic library.  

The ARK, which will open in early 2016, boasts Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine as a consultant and could ‘effectively transform the air transport of animals worldwide’.  

Read more about the idea here and tell us if you would treat your beloved pet to The ARK.

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Dine in style among ocean life


A striking new restaurant has been launched in the Maldives that allows guests to dine with ocean life.

To reach the Subsix restaurant, diners have to take a speedboat to the location and descend several staircases to reach this intriguing restaurant and bar.

The floor to ceiling windows allow guests to watch all sorts of underwater creatures, such as colourful butterflyfish, swimming around the surrounding coral reefs.

With unique furniture pieces and abstract chandeliers completing the experience, diners can immerse themselves with undersea life.

Read more about Subsix here and let us know if you would visit.

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The Unexpected Hill


A Turkish architecture studio has unveiled a unique public installation outside London’s Royal Academy of Arts.

SO? Architecture and Ideas has created The Unexpected Hill, which will host performances and activities until Sunday 20th September.

A response to the Royal Academy’s ‘transformation’ theme, the installation consists of blue and white ceramic triangular prisms stacked and staggered to create a 3D public seating area for visitors.

The studio was inspired by ‘Muqarnas’, a design technique typically found in Islamic architecture, which co-founder Sevince Bayrak described as ‘an example of using geometry to convert a 2D object into a 3D space’.

Discover the Unexpected Hill here and tell us if you’ll be visiting.

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The future of architecture in 20 buildings


Wired has put together a gallery of some of the most innovative buildings around, revealing how the future of architecture could be shaping up.

Describing architecture as being in an experimental phase, the article looks at a range of intriguing buildings that have been built, or at least designed, in recent years.

These include Jeanne Gang’s Aqua Tower, which uses an undulating, sculpture-like structure, and Magnus Larsson’s Dune Design, which would create architectural shapes using Sahara sand and bacteria.

Other examples, such as Hy-Fi by The Living, seem perfectly ordinary on the outside but have an innovative take on construction.

Hy-Fi is made from bricks grown from corn stalks and mushrooms in specially designed moulds, which were then coated in a light-refracting film.

Take a look at the whole gallery here and tell us which buildings you think show the future of architecture.

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