The Unexpected Hill


A Turkish architecture studio has unveiled a unique public installation outside London’s Royal Academy of Arts.

SO? Architecture and Ideas has created The Unexpected Hill, which will host performances and activities until Sunday 20th September.

A response to the Royal Academy’s ‘transformation’ theme, the installation consists of blue and white ceramic triangular prisms stacked and staggered to create a 3D public seating area for visitors.

The studio was inspired by ‘Muqarnas’, a design technique typically found in Islamic architecture, which co-founder Sevince Bayrak described as ‘an example of using geometry to convert a 2D object into a 3D space’.

Discover the Unexpected Hill here and tell us if you’ll be visiting.

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The future of architecture in 20 buildings


Wired has put together a gallery of some of the most innovative buildings around, revealing how the future of architecture could be shaping up.

Describing architecture as being in an experimental phase, the article looks at a range of intriguing buildings that have been built, or at least designed, in recent years.

These include Jeanne Gang’s Aqua Tower, which uses an undulating, sculpture-like structure, and Magnus Larsson’s Dune Design, which would create architectural shapes using Sahara sand and bacteria.

Other examples, such as Hy-Fi by The Living, seem perfectly ordinary on the outside but have an innovative take on construction.

Hy-Fi is made from bricks grown from corn stalks and mushrooms in specially designed moulds, which were then coated in a light-refracting film.

Take a look at the whole gallery here and tell us which buildings you think show the future of architecture.

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5 cities for a weekend getaway


If you are on the hunt for a creative weekend away, this post is for you.

Creative Bloq has put together a list of five different European cities that are easily accessible and worth a bit of expense.

Whether you are looking to improve your design skills, marvel at some historical architecture, or simply want to explore a different culture, there’s an exciting city for you on this list, which includes Helsinki and Marseille.

Take a look at the list here and tell us which city you would be ready to visit.

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21 fascinating house styles around the world


When you think of impressive architecture, it’s easy to think of striking skyscrapers or beautiful, historical buildings – but what about the humble house?

RubberBond’s creative team has created an interesting infographic showcasing some of the most fascinating house styles around the world, revealing how environments influence the way homes are designed and built.  

The infographic explores five different continents and points out their most outstanding house designs, such as the British Roundhouse, the A-frame (USA), and Japan’s Minka. 

Take a look at these fascinating styles here and tell us in which ones you would love to live.

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A village reclaimed by nature


A ‘lost’ fishing village on the eastern coast of China has been given a new, beautiful lease of life – it’s been reclaimed by nature.

Houtou Wan Village, in the Zhoushan Archipelago, was still occupied and thriving in the Fifties, but due to urbanisation, its population began to leave.

Now, with just a few residents left in the village, nature has started swallow bricks and paths, covering entire buildings with verdant green leaves and twisting brown branches.

The village has now been completely transformed into an almost silent, magical environment, haunting and undisturbed by humanity.

Discover this unique village here and tell us if you would like to visit it.

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Windows of the World


A Portuguese photographer has decided to focus his latest work on the surprising variety of windows around the globe.

André Vicente Goncalves compiled thousands of pictures of windows in different regions of the world and created a series called Windows of the World.

By grouping individual photos into larger frames, he emphasises the diversity of shapes, colours, and structures that windows come in.

Goncalves says: “I always had a curiosity about windows; like the structure of houses, they change from region to region, and it’s a big evolution from the earliest windows that were only a hole in the wall.”

Discover Windows of the World here and tell us what you think of the project.

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The Brutalist Playground


This summer, RIBA’s The Brutalist Playground will be open to the public as part of the London Festival of Architecture.

Designed as both a sculpture and an architectural installation, this immersive work of art is part of a new commission by the Turner Prize, architecture collective Assemble, and artist Simon Terrill.

The artists are inspired by the post-war playgrounds that now lie abandoned in parts of London like Pimlico and Paddington, images of which will be projected onto The Brutalist Playground’s concrete walls.

Assemble said: “the challenge of reconstructing elements of now forgotten Brutalist play structures within the RIBA gallery is an exciting opportunity for us to explore contemporary issues surrounding play, by looking at the often surreal objects from the past”.

Learn more about this exciting event here and tell us if you’ll be visiting.

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