21 fascinating house styles around the world


When you think of impressive architecture, it’s easy to think of striking skyscrapers or beautiful, historical buildings – but what about the humble house?

RubberBond’s creative team has created an interesting infographic showcasing some of the most fascinating house styles around the world, revealing how environments influence the way homes are designed and built.  

The infographic explores five different continents and points out their most outstanding house designs, such as the British Roundhouse, the A-frame (USA), and Japan’s Minka. 

Take a look at these fascinating styles here and tell us in which ones you would love to live.

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A village reclaimed by nature


A ‘lost’ fishing village on the eastern coast of China has been given a new, beautiful lease of life – it’s been reclaimed by nature.

Houtou Wan Village, in the Zhoushan Archipelago, was still occupied and thriving in the Fifties, but due to urbanisation, its population began to leave.

Now, with just a few residents left in the village, nature has started swallow bricks and paths, covering entire buildings with verdant green leaves and twisting brown branches.

The village has now been completely transformed into an almost silent, magical environment, haunting and undisturbed by humanity.

Discover this unique village here and tell us if you would like to visit it.

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Windows of the World


A Portuguese photographer has decided to focus his latest work on the surprising variety of windows around the globe.

André Vicente Goncalves compiled thousands of pictures of windows in different regions of the world and created a series called Windows of the World.

By grouping individual photos into larger frames, he emphasises the diversity of shapes, colours, and structures that windows come in.

Goncalves says: “I always had a curiosity about windows; like the structure of houses, they change from region to region, and it’s a big evolution from the earliest windows that were only a hole in the wall.”

Discover Windows of the World here and tell us what you think of the project.

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The Brutalist Playground


This summer, RIBA’s The Brutalist Playground will be open to the public as part of the London Festival of Architecture.

Designed as both a sculpture and an architectural installation, this immersive work of art is part of a new commission by the Turner Prize, architecture collective Assemble, and artist Simon Terrill.

The artists are inspired by the post-war playgrounds that now lie abandoned in parts of London like Pimlico and Paddington, images of which will be projected onto The Brutalist Playground’s concrete walls.

Assemble said: “the challenge of reconstructing elements of now forgotten Brutalist play structures within the RIBA gallery is an exciting opportunity for us to explore contemporary issues surrounding play, by looking at the often surreal objects from the past”.

Learn more about this exciting event here and tell us if you’ll be visiting.

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The world’s first multi-storey skatepark


If you’re a keen BMX rider or skateboarder, then Folkestone could be your new destination with a multi-storey skatepark in the works.

The design, commissioned by Roger De Haan and devised by Guy Hollaway, is believed to be the first of its kind.

Over six levels, the skatepark would incorporate undulating concrete floors for bikes and boards, an eleven metre high climbing wall, a basement boxing ring, and even a rooftop terrace.

Hollaway claims the plans could put the seaside town ‘on the map’ and encourage young people to remain in Folkestone.

Take a closer look at the design here and tell us if you’ll be making a trip to a world-first.

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Seoul Skygarden


A Dutch architecture studio will transform an old South Korean motorway into an impressive elevated public park.

MVRDV is in charge of creating the ‘Seoul Skygarden’, populating it with an incredible 254 different species of plants, which are organised according to the Korean alphabet.

In its new guise as the Skygarden, the currently abandoned section of the 1970s motorway will bring economic benefits to the area and act as a tranquil shortcut for pedestrians.

Winy Maas of MVRDV said that it “will change the daily lives of many people in Seoul for the better [as] a green oasis in the midst of all the traffic and concrete.”

Take a look at the stunning Skygarden here and tell us what you think.

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Clerkenwell Design Week: Review


The most exciting festival in Clerkenwell has come to an end.

Bigger and better than ever, this year’s CDW saw interactive installations, a vibrant fringe, immersive showroom experiences, and beautiful brands come together to showcase an astonishing range of creativity.

Our highlights (and photographs) are legion, but here are just a few final observations:

Jimbobart at Additions – St John’s Square

The brainchild of designer James Ward, Jimbobart is a range of slightly eccentric, very subversive ceramics based on ‘expressive animal drawings’. Our favourite is ‘The Cake Crusader’ (as pictured).

Metro Imaging – 32 Great Sutton Street

Visitors had an exclusive opportunity to explore the printing specialists’ work, which includes printing onto surfaces such as metal, glass, and stone. The Kate Moss print in particular stood out dramatically against the stark white walls.

Tarkett at Desso – 23-25 Great Sutton Street

Flooring manufacturer Tarkett teamed up with trend forecasters Scarlet Opus for a presentation on upcoming design trends for commercial interiors, with a translation for flooring. Trend Presenter Sally Angharad gave a highly engaging snapshot of the current influences on the creative industry and how these are set to evolve during this year and next.

We’ve thoroughly enjoyed Clerkenwell Design Week; let us know your CDW highlights.

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