3D-printed typographical cityscapes


TextscapeAn artist has combined typography with architecture to create interactive, 3D-printed documents.

Hongtao Zhou’s ‘Textscape’ incorporates layers of letters, numbers, and braille, which are built up to different levels for a textured effect.

The three-dimensional blocks also visually profile their subject matter – one of the documents is about New York City and it emulates its cityscape and skyscrapers.

The artist was inspired by early Chinese woodblock printing, making an association with 3D printing.

See Textscape in more detail here and let us know what you think.

A hotel made from salt


Salt hotelA new hotel has opened in Bolivia and it is almost entirely made from salt.

Located on the world’s largest salt flat, the Hotel Luna Salada is constructed of solid salt bricks, a feature that is obvious from the unpainted white-grey walls.

However, most of the furniture is also made from salt, with just a few standard fixtures and fittings providing a Bolivian feel.

Explore the hotel in the video below and let us know if you’ll be booking a stay in this unique hotel.

Architecture firm creates fruit-inspired buildings


Architects create fruit-inspired buildingsArchea Associati has developed a facility for the 11th International Conference on Grapevine Breeding and Genetics.

Situated in Yanqing Country, north of Beijing, the 200-hectare site includes museums, landscape towers, bridges, greenhouses and a visitor centre. It is also home to several fruit-inspired landscape pavilions.

The architects explained: “Landscape pavilions have been designed as circles as a metaphor for grape bunches spread over the landscape.”

Relief patterns in landscape pavilions’ concrete facades further add to the striking design.

Take a closer look at the development here.

Historic ruins restored with a geometric façade


Historic Ruins restored with Geometric FacadeThe crumbling ruins of a convent in Spain have been restored using a striking geometric façade.

Demolished in 2000, remnants of the early 18th century Sant Francesc Convent were previously all that remained of the church building. David Closes renovated the church by integrating faceted glass elements into the three hundred year old building.

The glass façade unites the crumbling structure and echoes the church’s original geometry with parallel lines. Incorporating striking modern elements into his design, the architect showcases the original design with a subtle update.

Take a closer look at the convent here.

An adaptable pop-up habitat


Pop-up habitatPeople’s Architecture Office has created a pop-up habitat that can be adapted to its environment.

The system consists of units made from gold photographer’s reflective panels, which can stand alone or become part of a larger geometric ‘mega-structure’.

The lightweight habitat, which has been used at exhibitions, can act as tunnels, canopies, exhibition spaces and auditoriums – as well as intriguing pieces of art scattered around a landscape.

Find out more about the habitat here and let us know what you think.

Art of Building Photographer of the Year shortlist


Art of BuildingThe shortlist for the Art of Building Photographer of the Year competition has been revealed.

The fifteen shortlisted pictures include stunning interpretations of constructions such as One London Bridge, an Amsterdam metro line, and the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi.

The competition, which has been running for five years, is organised by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and is overseen by a panel of judges of photography experts.

The winner of the competition will be announced on 5th February and will win £3,000.

Take a look at the shortlist here and tell us which is your favourite.

UK creative industry to be worth £100bn by 2018


UK creative industryThe creative industry will be worth more than £100bn to the British economy by 2018, according to new research.

The study, by Falmouth University and the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR), also predicts that by 2018, 1.39 million people will be employed in the industry and exports will reach £34.5bn.

The industry includes advertising and marketing, architecture, and entertainment (which incorporates music, performing arts, film, and television).

Professor Anne Carlisle of Falmouth University said: “The UK creative industries are well established and admired on a global stage – the UK economy must continue to capitalise on this lead.”

Find out more about the research here.

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