A unique sloping staircase


Sloping staircaseA unique staircase flows through a home as one structure over two levels.

The staircase by Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop consists of sleek wooden slats that are built into the wall of the apartment.

The stairs slope downwards to provide the lower set of steps where they attach to the opposite wall, creating a sweeping, natural motion.

Providing lighting and ventilation to the apartment, the staircase was devised as a sculpture and centrepiece to the residence.

Take a closer look at the staircase here and tell us if you would like this in your home.

Clerkenwell Design Week


Visualisation of Jaguar Foscarini installationThe fifth Clerkenwell Design Week opened on Tuesday 20th May, hosting the most innovative products, designers and brands around. Here are a few of our favourite locations on the showcase trail:

Design Factory – The Farmiloe Building

Jaguar and Italian lighting firm Foscarini have created a dramatic scene in the Design Factory’s atrium, pairing a bespoke Jaguar with a supersized light installation by Ferruccio Laviani.

Jaguar invited designers to submit concept wraps for its new Jaguar F-TYPE Coupé, using the #FearlessDesign hashtag on Twitter and Instagram.

The winning design, ‘Untamed Creativity’ by Justin Silke, resembles a dynamic scrawl, which Jaguar described as embodying their ‘design ethos of visual drama and individualism’.

Laviani’s Tuareg consists of orange and black tubular elements arranged into a three-dimensional structure and suspended from the ceiling. There are other Tuareg installations on display in the Foscarini stage, alongside other work, including Big Bang by Vicente Garcia Jimenez, Lightwing by Jean Marie Massaud and Rituals by Ludovica and Roberto Palomba.

Detail – St. John’s Square

Another exhibition worth visiting is Detail at St. John’s Square, which hosts luxury interior brands. One must-see is the edra showcase in the medieval crypt of the Order of St. John; featuring work from designers such as the Campana brothers, the pieces combine eclectic influences and reimagine them in classic furniture styles. The lowlights and tranquillity of the crypt somehow enhance the ‘otherness’ of the collection, ensuring a memorable experience.


Tile Mile – St. John’s Gate

Tile Mile - DezeenTile Mile invites visitors to revel in the kaleidoscopic effect of the transformed St. John’s Gate, which is described in The Icon Guide to CDW as being ‘reminiscent of the famous Basilica Cistern in Istanbul’.

Using mirrors in the inner arches and a complex, colourful floor tile design, Tile Mile also reflects the archway’s stunning vaulted ceiling. The temporary installation was created by architects russ + henshaw and sponsored by Turkishceramics.

Find out more about Clerkenwell Design Week (which runs until the 22nd May) here.

Study sheds light on retail environments


The relationship between lighting and customer experience has been explored in a new study, which reveals some interesting findings about customer perception.

The experiment, which was conducted by Zumtobel and Gruppe Nymphenburg, presented forty eight participants – who were put into groups based on their personality types – with a computer simulation of a retail display.

The picture underwent twenty changes in lighting while the participants were monitored for any unconscious physical reactions they might have, such as cardiac or neurological activity.

The study found that the ‘stimulance’ group (made of ‘hedonists’ and ‘adventurers’) had a positive reaction to strong lighting contrasts, such as bold spotlights, while the ‘balance’ group (‘bon vivants’, ‘harmonisers’ and ‘traditionalists’) and the ‘dominance’ group (‘performers’ and ‘disciplinarians’) preferred softer, more subtle lighting effects.

It has been suggested that these results could be used to modify retail environments’ lighting to suit their target audience. Read more about the study here.

Designer transforms waste into unique furniture


Designer Piet Hein Eek, famous for making furniture from waste material, has taken his vision one step further by creating his ‘Waste Waste’ range.

‘Waste Waste’ uses the wood offcuts that are too small to be used in the original ‘Waste’ collection, in which he takes scrap material and constructs items from scratch. For the new range, Eek cuts the awkwardly-shaped remnants into 40mm by 40mm cubes and uses them as a skin on a design rather than the whole construction, cutting down on labour and time.

This method creates simple, strong pieces, such as round ‘pixellated’ tables, and each piece is unique due to the cubes’ original varnish or paint.

Take a look at the collection here and tell us if you would have one of these pieces in your living room.

Ancient church revived by David Closes


This 18th century church built for the Sant Francesc convent has been revived by David Closes.

The church’s ancient architecture has been preserved in this new design, whilst also reinventing the building in a contemporary way.

The project aimed to convert the unused church into an auditorium and general cultural facility for the local Catalan area.

Take a closer look at this project here, and tell us if you think a church near you could do with some of this architectural inspiration.

Ajando’s ‘Next Level’ working environment


Cross-media agency Ajando are to use a very unusual loft as their new corporate headquarters, which has had its design inspired by quantum physicist John Wheeler, the architecture of Josef Hoffmann and, of course, the information expertise of Ajando.

Built upon the premise that “material is not the building material of our world, but rather information” this project aimed to deliver an architectural concept that mirrored the data and information that flows through Ajando. 

Needless to say internationally renowned architect Peter Stasek and Loftwerk architects had their hands full when commissioned to facilitate this ambition.

However the end product is impressive and as a result, the loft becomes a live cross-media platform in real life with perfect usability.

Take a closer look at this interesting project here, and tell us if this is a working environment you would enjoy.

The Global Design Forum – Design can make the world a better place


Global Design ForumGlobal Design ForumThe Global Design Forum brings together the most revered names across the sectors of design, branding, social enterprise and innovation. The Forum takes place in London starting on 16th September and is part of The London Design Festival.

The event will be the pre-eminent platform to explore and debate the powerful and pressing issues facing design. Most importantly, the event will explore how design can make the world a better place.

This forum will open with legendary designer and thinker Peter Saville taking part in a lively and provocative conversation with leading commentator and critic Paul Morley. The following day, across four sessions at the Southbank Centre, we will hear from advertising legend Sir John Hegarty; serial entrepreneur Brent Hoberman; designer, author and educator Ilse Crawford; BMW Group’s Head of Design Adrian van Hooydonk; the Head of Design at HTC Scott Croyle; not to mention Justine Simons, the Acting Deputy Mayor for Culture at the London Mayor’s Office; Alexei Orlov, the Chief Marketing Officer for Volkswagen Group China; Carmel Allen, Brand Champion of British interiors store Heal’s; and top international designers Ross Lovegrove (UK), Jaime Hayon (Spain) and Michael Young (Hong Kong). Comprising of one-on-one conversations, panel discussions, fast-paced presentations and Q&A sessions, the Forum creates a rich platform for open discussion and debate.

Be one of only 300 delegates to help set the global agenda for design and book your tickets now here, and tell us which issues you think could be discussed.

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