Sony World Photography Awards 2015 shortlist revealed


The world’s biggest photography competition has unveiled its shortlist. Sony World Photography Awards 2015

Amazing entries from all over the world have been received for this year’s Sony World Photography Awards – the highest amount since its creation. 

Astrid Merget Motsenigos, Creative Director of the World Photography Organisation and organizer of the awards, says “the sole purpose of the Sony World Photography Awards is to celebrate and appreciate the talented artists working in the photographic industry.”

You will be able to have a proper look at the shortlisted images at Somerset House in London from April 24 to May 10.

Discover some of the photographs here and tell us what you think.

Iconic building gains trompe l’oeil wrap


Building wrapThe famous Banqueting House in Whitehall is to feature a stunning trompe l’oeil wrap as it undergoes major restoration work.

Banqueting House will be covered in a full-height wrap giving the illusion of a torn façade revealing its five hundred year history.

The façade, designed by Northover & Brown, references the building’s striking ceiling by the famous painter Peter Paul Rubens and the sketches of designer Inigo Jones.

Northover & Brown has also created a series of animations based on the Banqueting House’s history, which will be projected onto the windows from inside the building.

Let us know if you would like to see more conservation schemes given a creative twist.

Artist recreates famous pictures with Pantone swatches


An artist uses Pantone Swatches to recreate famous paintings. 

Nick Smith uses hundreds of different Pantone swatches in order to give life to work of arts with a pixelated impression.

He has recreated masterpieces of legendary artists such as Andy Warhol, Vincent van Gogh, and Leonardo da Vinci.

You can discover Smith’s artworks at his art show, ‘Psycolourgy’, held at the Lawrence Alkin Gallery in London until 21 February 2015.

Have a look at some of them here and tell us what you think about it.

BAFTA promotes awards with film noir-inspired prints


BAFTAThe British Academy of Film and Television promoted this year’s awards with a striking poster campaign. 

BAFTA created film noir-inspired prints that symbolise the glamour and elegance of the event, while representing some of the films nominated, such as The Grand Budapest Hotel (image on the right).

BAFTA print editor, Toby Weidmann, described the campaign as “eye-poppingly beautiful and inordinately original.”

Take a look at the different prints here and tell us which is your favourite.

‘Dancing House’ light installation


Dancing housesAn artist is presenting an interesting project for the Light Festival in Ghent, Belgium. 

Klaus Obermaier’s ‘Dancing House’ interactive installation allows you to distort a house while you move.

Visitors can stand in front of the display, where they are invited to move their arms and bodies to change the building’s shape and hear the sound of the wind as they do so. 

As this festival becomes increasingly popular (over half a million visitors in the previous years), it has been named one of Europe’s top 10 light art festivals.

Watch the video below and tell us what you think about it.

A shimmering landscape made from thousands of CDs


CD landscapeAn artist has created a piece of art made of 60,000 old CDs.

French artist Elise Morin introduced the Waste Landscape installation last year at Kunsthalle in Košice, Slovakia during White Night 2014.

The vast mass of the hand-sewn CDs on inflatable mounds looks different to everyone in the audience due to the various lighting schemes.

The artist explains that the choice of a CD is a symbolic one when responding to the growing waste produced by modern society – for her, it represents the vision of the economy of western societies in the second part of the 20th century.

Take a look at the video of the installation below and tell us what you think.

//player.vimeo.com/video/111012341

Colourful flowers frozen in ice


Ice FlowersA botanical artist in Tokyo has encased colourful flowers in blocks of ice, exploring how this changes the plants’ life cycles.

Makoto Azuma’s ‘Ice Flowers’ enhances the vibrancy and size of the bouquets, which have been arranged in a derelict warehouse outside of the city.

However, as the ice melts, the flowers will wither, until they are left in puddles of water.

Azuma says: ‘please enjoy how flowers and ice change themselves over time in the ruins far from human existence – it is an inorganic space that makes a vivid contrast with flowers’.

Take a closer look at the installation here and tell us what you think of it.

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