The world’s most controversial buildings


Did you know that some of the world’s most beloved buildings were once hated by thousands?

Iconic designs such as The Eiffel Tower, Tower Bridge, and Empire State Building all gained bad reputations when first built, but now are seen as innovative and symbolic of their home cities.

For example, the famous writer Guy de Maupassant described the Eiffel Tower as a “tall skinny pyramid of iron ladders, this giant and disgraceful skeleton”. Some people even looked forward to the Tower being taken down as scheduled (a day which never passed).

Read more about the world’s most controversial buildings here and tell us what you think. 

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A Gensler-designed pet pampering centre


New York’s JFK Airport is planning to open a new animal spa centre.  

International architecture firm Gensler has designed The ARK, which allows pets to have their own luxury experiences while travelling.  

Treatments include a veterinary hospital, a care centre with a spa and grooming services, and even a diagnostic library.  

The ARK, which will open in early 2016, boasts Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine as a consultant and could ‘effectively transform the air transport of animals worldwide’.  

Read more about the idea here and tell us if you would treat your beloved pet to The ARK.

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Dine in style among ocean life


A striking new restaurant has been launched in the Maldives that allows guests to dine with ocean life.

To reach the Subsix restaurant, diners have to take a speedboat to the location and descend several staircases to reach this intriguing restaurant and bar.

The floor to ceiling windows allow guests to watch all sorts of underwater creatures, such as colourful butterflyfish, swimming around the surrounding coral reefs.

With unique furniture pieces and abstract chandeliers completing the experience, diners can immerse themselves with undersea life.

Read more about Subsix here and let us know if you would visit.

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The London Blitz in colour


The Imperial War Museum has released rare colour photos of London during the Second World War.

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Blitz, the museum has revealed unique footage covering London life, from famous landmarks to everyday scenes, in full colour.

The photos reveal how the Blitz, which took place between September 1940 and May 1941, affected the capital city, from the patriotic hoarding on Nelson’s Column to the dramatic ruins around St Paul’s Cathedral.

These amazing photos are part of a larger exhibition called ‘Horrible Histories: Blitzed Brits’, which you can discover in Manchester’s Imperial War Museum until April 2016.

Take a look at these rare photographs here and tell us if you’ll be going to the exhibition.

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A video game inspired by The Grand Budapest Hotel


A group of American students has released a quirky new video game, based on a Wes Anderson film.

‘Maquisard’, devised by students at New York University’s Game Center, is loosely inspired by the Oscar-winning film The Grand Budapest Hotel.

The game places you in the role of a lobby boy tasked with finding a secret agent; the setting is a labyrinth of hotel rooms, which are designed with Wes Anderson’s style in mind.

Download the game for free here and watch the video below to see it in action:

https://player.vimeo.com/video/130695750

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The Unexpected Hill


A Turkish architecture studio has unveiled a unique public installation outside London’s Royal Academy of Arts.

SO? Architecture and Ideas has created The Unexpected Hill, which will host performances and activities until Sunday 20th September.

A response to the Royal Academy’s ‘transformation’ theme, the installation consists of blue and white ceramic triangular prisms stacked and staggered to create a 3D public seating area for visitors.

The studio was inspired by ‘Muqarnas’, a design technique typically found in Islamic architecture, which co-founder Sevince Bayrak described as ‘an example of using geometry to convert a 2D object into a 3D space’.

Discover the Unexpected Hill here and tell us if you’ll be visiting.

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IKEA ad monkeys around


IKEA has unveiled its latest ad, featuring monkeys having fun with an IKEA METOD kitchen.

Representing the furniture brand’s ‘The Wonderful Everyday’ strapline, you can see the monkeys opening all the cupboards, playing with the food and even enjoying a little shower from the tap. 

Filmed in Costa Rica’s Jaguar Rescue Centre, the company is trying to convey the message that “cooking doesn’t need to be governed by convention or worry, it can be a joyous playground.”

Watch this light-hearted video below and tell us what you think of it.

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